Meg Beaudoin Ceramics


My work is inspired by the natural world and the human body. It aims to reflect the color, depth, and perfect imperfection of natural forms.
As with natural forms, imperfection is not a shortcoming but a source of beauty; the irregularity of the bark of the tree or of its trunk
as it adapts in its growth around boulders, the light and shadows within the wrinkles of the face and hands or the folds of flesh in
the torso. It is such beauty that the work strives to make manifest. And as with natural forms where surface and shape unite, where there
is no actual duality to mind and body, the successful ceramic work is the result of a union of form and surface where one is actualized by
the presence of the other. The surface is only itself insofar as the form inhabits it and the form exists only as the surface meets the
air that surrounds it. 

My work is both functional and sculptural, useful and beautiful. I conceive of it as beautiful because it is useful, and useful
because it is beautiful. I believe that ceramics is art made an active part of life. From this perspective there is no essential difference between
ceramic art and functional pottery. As a ceramicist I use earth in the form of clay, water in order to shape the clay, fire to turn the
clay into stone and so contain air inside of the new form that is created. The new form is a result of a confluence of the basic
elements of nature with the hands, mind, and heart of the maker. 

I do not conceive of my work as an act of self expression but rather as an act of world expression. Making, firing, touching and beholding
connects me to the world and so forms a bridge between inside and outside. Similarly, the work itself creates a new relationship
between inside and outside. The world is re-presented and as a result it is re-discoverable in direct connection to ourselves.